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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
FOX News
Feb 15, 2013 12:00pm PST
planet. it happened in the past hour, nasa said the meteorite in russia had nothing to do with the asteroid, about the size of half a football field. joining me, astronomer david dundee. the question is, as i have just answered, there was nothing to do with the two of them one is more common than the other. meteorites in the sky of russia coming down. how rare is that? >> well, meteorite impacts happen all the time. the earth picks up tons of debris every day but it's usually in the form of dust and smaller objects. one the size of what we saw in russia is a once in a decade thing. last time this happened was about ten years ago, over in the pakistan, india region of the world. but the two objects are totally unrelated and one of the other big things to consider is that you're separating the two events by 14 hours. remember, the earth is hurling around the sun at 19 miles per second so we're in a different neighborhood than weapon the meet -- when the meteor came in in russia. >> that's interesting. everything's moving at once. how fast was this thing going? >> the top sea
CNN
Feb 15, 2013 1:00pm PST
apparently unfounded. nasa is using radar and other technology to study how the asteroid behaves, including its rotation rate, its composition and how it's impacted by the earth's gravity. the idea is to learn enough to prevent cat as it sfroe fee from it threatening in the future. >> we're going to get a lot of information about the asteroid. we're interested in its future motion, whether or not it could come back, whether it threatens the earth. >> reporter: the odds are either this one or another will be back. an asteroid impact the earth about every 120 years on average. it will be visible in the rthernemisphere this evening if you have access to a telescope. for now it's on its way away from the earth out into outer space harmlessly rotating -- or resolving -- excuse me. harmlessly rotating -- i can't even think of the right word. orbiting the sun. harmlessly at least for now, jim. >> casey, thanks very much. we appreciate it. ? or gal lat particular news, a meteor lit up the skies over eastern russia. the blinding light was followed by a series of deafening explosions. listen to this.
Current
Feb 14, 2013 4:00pm PST
. this is a serious thing right? people say why doesn't nasa do something about it, and there are cool old political reasons. first of all, it wasn't part of nasa's charter it wasn't human space flight or science it's just cataloging objects that are scientifically understood, blah blah blah blah. we work hard to raise awareness of this, and so oh, we are maybe getting there. cenk: how much money do you think is needed to catalog it? >> it's a great question. there's two things we do wrong as c.e.o. of a non-profit. we don't ask for money and then we don't ask for enough. cenk: so fix it right now. don't be like a down sore, fix it. >> we can approach the problem in two ways, first to get the sentinel spacecraft flying, that's about $450 million. then between now and when that could possibly happen, it's about that much money and then after that, to go deflect one it's about that much money. cenk: we're talking about a billion. >> 1.5 billion. it's what the curious city rover cost. we might find something on mars that might dare i say it, change the world. cenk: bush said let's go drill on mars, it'
ABC
Feb 15, 2013 1:40am PST
's surprising is nasa didn't even see it. we'll tell you why, coming up next right here on "world news now." >>> "world news now" weather brought to you by consumer cellular. have given way to sleeping. tossing and turning where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep. and lunesta®(eszopiclone) can help you get there. like it has for so many people before. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. lunesta should not be taken together with alcohol. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. then find out how to get lunesta for as low as fifteen doll
MSNBC
Feb 15, 2013 10:00am PST
of the meteorite's powerful landing. right now nasa is keeping close watch over an asteroid as it hurdles about 17,000 miles above the earth's surface. a record-setting approach near our planet and apparently it's under 50 feet wide. tom costello joins me from the newsroom. tom, what do we know so far about what happened in russia? >> it was absolutely unbelievable. it was spectacular. what's kind of interesting here is so many people in russia these days have these little go pro cameras because they want to capture when they're hit in a traffic accident or official corruption. we have many views of this asteroid traveling at 33,000 miles per hour slamming into the earth's atmosphere above southwestern russia. this happened at 9:15 this morning. this town has a million people in it. thankfully most of the debris actually fell outside of the town, but it blew out the windows in nearly every single building and in many, many homes, and keep in mind, these are soviet era designs, so they're not terribly well built. a short time ago i talked to a canadian who was living there in that particular part o
CNN
Feb 15, 2013 6:00am PST
the kind of objects that nasa cannot predict ahead of time. they're too small to actually track. the as asteroid that's passing the earth later this afternoon is an object that nasa can pick up ahead of time and can track. by the way, the two events are not related in any way. it's just a chance circumstance that both of these happened on the same day. >> okay. well, let's talk more about this asteroid. as we said, we know that's coming. so every ten years we can expect this sort of thing that happened over russia to happen somewhere in the world and there's not much we can do about it? >> no. there's no way really to predict objects that small coming into the earth atmosphere. tellus museum here is part of the network of nasa set up with fireball cameras. we have several in the southeast. and a few in the west. and this is part of a project, an effort, to track bright meteors. and we track about 8 to 12 bright meteors every night over cartersville. but when we link it with other cameras, we can tell how fast, how high, and even plot where in the solar system these smaller objec
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2013 11:30pm EST
there. go look it the web site on nasa. you can see every landing site. if anybody does not believe we ever went to the moon, does go look at that. [laughter] >> charlie, it's funny. i met you in texas. i did not know this but you were the guy who had some very famous words as apollo 11 was going through its trials and tribulations. talk about that. you are part of history for that. >> i was very fortunate to have been involved in five of the nine missions we sent to the moon. i started with apollo 10. it was not designed to land. i helped develop the procedures to activate the lunar module. i was in mission control when i started talking to them when they started the descent. that was a dress rehearsal for apollo 11. the first time we going to attempt the landing on the moon. neil armstrong asked me to do the same job for them on apollo 11. two months, we had to get ready. we modified the procedure somewhat. then we were ready to go. so i was in mission control of the dissent. as we started down, things started coming unglued we have computer problems. we had a trajectory problem take
FOX News
Feb 16, 2013 6:00am EST
to be amateur astronomers right now. those people have the most eyes on the sky. even nasa is looking at the skies but in terms of shear numbers, there are lots of people out in their backyards with telescopes looking up at the sky and this -- asteroid that missed us was discovered by amateurs. >> i knew save the world. dave mosier good to see you this morning. thanks for insight. appreciate it unbelievable video high speed police chase horrific ending. car crashing right into the cruiser. whole thing caught on camera. this happens way too much. and then for the first time in almost 600 years the pope has resigned. if you have got a lifelong career, like the pontiff, when is the right time to call it quits? fbn nicole petallides is here to talk about retirement coming up. hey nicole. she will be in here in a second. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. we don't let frequent heartburn
MSNBC
Feb 14, 2013 8:00am PST
in the tracking? >> the good thing is that nasa and other agencies have been diligent about tracking this asteroid for some time now, so they have very good data on what the orbital pass of this is, and they can tell within a very few hundred feet or so, maybe a few hundred miles, how close this is to earth, and they know for sure that it won't come any closer than 17,150. that's pretty good. it's great they do that because they can look at other potentials like this too. >> we can be that accurate about its size and its pass of the earth, but let's get to this $200 billion number about what its cost would be worth. how do we get to that number? how do we put a price tag on this asteroid? >> well, you know, we could look at the composition ofas resides and figure out what their value is according to their mineral worth. if we could actually mine them and, of course, that's another story altogether, but when we think about the kind of minerals that we find there, some of them very rare ones that we need here on earth or that we use quite extentively here on earth, and we have somewhat limited suppl
CNN
Feb 15, 2013 4:00am PST
-wide asteroid heading for earth. here's an image of the asteroid from nasa when it was more than 450,000 miles from earth. tom foreman has the details on how close it will get. >> let's get reference points. we talk about the earth many of us like to think the moon is close to us but the moon is not as close as you think. it's almost a quarter million miles away so what is close in space in satellites, we've been launching these for decades and filled the sky. some are fairly low, others quite high. the highest are communications and gps satellites, about 22,000 miles up in the air. where is this asteroid going to be? it is going to shoot out of the sky and cut right through the top of the satellite belt, at about 17,000 miles. >> an awful lot going on in the skies right now so we're joined by bill nye the science guy, is he in los angeles. bill, the meteor shower in russia, the ast noid some 17,000 miles away, i think everyone really has two questions here, first of all, is there a connection here and is there a difference between a meteor shower and an asteroid? help us out. >> oh, yeah, yea
FOX
Feb 14, 2013 7:00am PST
it passes by earth tomorrow morning but you will be able to watch the historic site online. nasa will stream the approach starting at 9:00 a.m. at pacific time. the fly-by is expected to be the closest an asteroid has ever come to earth. it will be -- it will be about 17,000 miles from earth. the closest will be in indonesia. astronomers say it's about the size of a white house. >> that's a big boy. >> yeah, it is pretty big. >>> 7:54. >>> steve and i have been on fog patrol. we went on the air at 4:30 we've been watching it for hours now. steve will talk about the fog. but visibility is improving for drivers. if you are driving to the bay bridge toll plaza, that even looks a little bit better. the fog was pretty low at one point. it's backed under for about a 25 to 30-minute delay. that's your live drive time there. once you get on the bridge, another 12 to 15 minutes on the span. also, contra costa county is beginning to get slower. traffic time is way down from pleasant hill to walnut creek in danville and alamo. let's go to steve. >>> we still have areas of fog. other locations are alrea
KRON
Feb 15, 2013 4:00am PST
east of los angeles. his remains were identified during an autopsy through dental records. >> nasa says an asteroid half the size of a football field will whiz by, close to the earth today. >> inside to say, while there is no cause for concern, it will pass by a remarkably close the distance. around 17,000 mi. or 27,000 kiloliters. tom foreman explains a close call. >> where is this asteroid going to be. it is going to shoot out of the sky and cut right through the top of the satellite built at about 17,000 mi.. is that dangerous? not really. in part because the size of this. the official name is 2012 the a 14. it can travel 18,000 mi. an hour. if it were to hit earth it would have a huge explosion. that would not be enough to harm the turf unless it hit a populated place. it will knock down trees and destroyed areas and several hundred miles. scientists have been tracking it for more than 2 million mi.. they say it will not hit the earth and ms. even though it is a close call. >> tonight at 7 the juchab ot space and science center will hold an asteroid during party for the 2012 da -14
CSPAN
Feb 11, 2013 12:00pm EST
system. nasa's space exploration program, and work on necessary new satellites. these are weather satellite programs. these are sequestration's negative impacts. the diverse group of leaders here with us today are going to be attesting to this. regarding the overall economy, about six months ago be released a study conducted by dr. stephen fuller of george mason university. the study bus methodology is conclusions are grim. it's as sequestration if going forward will put 2.1 million u.s. jobs at risk. these are defense and non- defense-related jobs, and include nearly 1 million small businesses. it will cost the unemployment rate to rise about 1.5%, and reduce expected gdp growth by $215 billion. $215 billion. the latest congressional budget office forecast -- be oak reinforces the conclusion, that sequestration will undermine economic growth. today we are read-releasing dr. fuller's study and his analysis of the impact of impact of sequestration. let it be noted no one can say that they were not for ward about the full consequences of this very bad policy. this morning, to emphas
MSNBC
Feb 16, 2013 11:00am PST
saw something strange in the sky last night, a streaking flash of light. nasa tells us it could have been another meteor or some sort of space debris burning up as it entered the atmosphere. fortunately, nobody was hurt in california. >>> some new details about christopher dorner's last moments. an autopsy showed the former l.a. cop died of a single gunshot to the head. they say at this point it looks like it was self-inflicted. dorner locked himself in a cabin that caught fire during the final standoff with police. >>> a new pope before easter? could pop. pope benedict xvi will step down at the end of the month. current rules make march 15th the earliest possible date to pick a new pope but the vet kat says the date could be pushed up if all of the cardinals make it to rome early for a vote. >>> weary passengers from a carnival cruise ship "triumph" today are adjusting to being back on dry land with running water and working toilets. the passengers finally departed the crippled ship early friday in mobile, alabama, the more than 4,200 passengers and crew were then taken to new orlea
CSPAN
Feb 11, 2013 8:00pm EST
's operation of the national airspace system, nasa's space exploration program, and noaa's work on necessary new satellites. these are weather satellite programs. these are sequestration's negative impacts. the diverse group of leaders here with us today is going to be attesting to this. regarding the overall economy, about six months ago we released a study conducted by dr. stephen fuller of george mason university. the study's methodology is sound and its conclusions are grim. the study says, see quest racial -- sequestration, if it goes forward, will put 2.1 million u.s. jobs at risk. these are defense and non-defense-related jobs, and include nearly 1 million small businesses. it will cost the unemployment rate to rise about 1.5%, and reduce expected gdp growth by $215 billion. $215 billion. the latest congressional budget office forecast reinforces the conclusion, that sequestration will undermine economic growth. today we are re-releasing dr. fuller's study and his analysis of the impact of impact of sequestration. let it be noted no one can say that they were not forewarned about the
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)